Author Topic: Newbie DVD Conversion Basics for WDTV.  (Read 34116 times)

January 04, 2010, 04:22:10 AM
Reply #15

DavidWinter

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twisty, this is an excellent guide. You say "Iím a farmer, not a programmer" (which reminds me of the famous "I'm a doctor, Jim" :) ), but if only more people who call themselves "experts" would write guides that comprehensible...

Anyway. I haven't bought a WD TV for myself, but I got one for my father, who doesn't want to deal with computers, and he seems to be happy with it.

I considered doing the same as you, i.e. rip my existing DVDs, but I definitely need soft (switchable) subtitles. So just to make sure this is worth trying: With Handbrake 0.94, you get "soft" subtitles (stored as what; an SRT file?) when transcoding to H.264?

And how do I get these to play on the WD TV (Live)? Can I just put the .m4v file from Handbrake and the subtitles file in a folder on a harddisk, or is a specific container format/file extension required?

And have you tried using several subtitles (in several languages) on the WD TV?

Thanks again for the good work!

January 04, 2010, 02:31:48 PM
Reply #16

twisty

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I considered doing the same as you, i.e. rip my existing DVDs, but I definitely need soft (switchable) subtitles. So just to make sure this is worth trying: With Handbrake 0.94, you get "soft" subtitles (stored as what; an SRT file?) when transcoding to H.264?

Handbrake 094 does both soft (switchable) and hard (burned in) subtitles.  Soft subs are stored in your chosen container as bitmap (VOBSUB).  .srt can be imported before conversion.  Handbrake does NOT convert VOBSUB to .srt.

And how do I get these to play on the WD TV (Live)? Can I just put the .m4v file from Handbrake and the subtitles file in a folder on a harddisk, or is a specific container format/file extension required?

And have you tried using several subtitles (in several languages) on the WD TV?

Thanks again for the good work!


I don't have one of them new fangled "Live" but I guess it should all work the same.  Handbrake with .m4v (.mp4) can not pass-through VOBSUB tracks.  see http://trac.handbrake.fr/wiki/Subtitles for much more detail.  Handbrake with .mkv (what I use) can pass-through multiple VOBSUB tracks.  I often have more than one English VOBSUB and have, on occassion, mistakenly added foriegn subtitles.  Once the file (.m4v or .mkv) has been converted place it where you need it for the WDTV to access.  Spend some time at the Handbrake guide (above) if you intend using Handbrake further.

Glad to help  ;D
42" Sony & 32" Teac. Gigabit Network + NetComm NP210 Ethernet over power.  4TB WD ShareSpace NAS.  WDLXTV 0.5.8.1.  MSheet 2.1.1.
Noob WDTV Video Conversion Basics Tutorial http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=3314.0

March 01, 2010, 02:50:42 PM
Reply #17

Whoheart

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I've seen downloaded video on my system and the quality sucks  :o

Not that i wish to lead you into a life of crime, but I suggest there is a difference between a 155 Megabyte Avi and a 27 gigabyte blueray download ;-)

I often have more than one English VOBSUB and have, on occassion, mistakenly added foriegn subtitles.  Once the file (.m4v or .mkv) has been converted place it where you need it for the WDTV to access.  Spend some time at the Handbrake guide (above) if you intend using Handbrake further.

You could, if you wish, remove the extra subtitles again with Mkvtoolnix programs. It doesn't reencode so no quality change, so doesn't take long.

On the other hand subtitles are so tiny and take up such a small amount of file there isn't any real point in doing so.

If you were to remove all the subtitles from your wife's 1500 DVD's it would probably amount to less space than one Star Trek episode :)
If you think there is something wrong with your WD device contact them and then act upon that: Either wait or move on - don't whine here - this is not WD's board. If you have a problem, start a thread and ask - perhaps someone knows the answer.

March 01, 2010, 11:38:37 PM
Reply #18

twisty

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G'day Whoheart, thanks for the reply.

Not that i wish to lead you into a life of crime, but I suggest there is a difference between a 155 Megabyte Avi and a 27 gigabyte blueray download ;-)

hehehehe ... I'm to old and slow to be led anywhere. Thanks for the concern though  ;D  There sure would be a  difference between the 2 files but 27 gig is almost 6 months downloads for me, so, not something I would (ever) consider.

You could, if you wish, remove the extra subtitles again with Mkvtoolnix programs. It doesn't reencode so no quality change, so doesn't take long.

On the other hand subtitles are so tiny and take up such a small amount of file there isn't any real point in doing so.

If you were to remove all the subtitles from your wife's 1500 DVD's it would probably amount to less space than one Star Trek episode :)

That's my solution as well.  A quick check of one of my .mkv files (2gig) shows 83% of total file size is video, 15% audio (1 AC3 track) and 2% subtitles (2 vobsub tracks).  Much easier to teach my dear wife correct use of the "options" button  ;D
42" Sony & 32" Teac. Gigabit Network + NetComm NP210 Ethernet over power.  4TB WD ShareSpace NAS.  WDLXTV 0.5.8.1.  MSheet 2.1.1.
Noob WDTV Video Conversion Basics Tutorial http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=3314.0

March 10, 2010, 12:27:56 AM
Reply #19

jimmy8765

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wow,thanks,it's usefull

I like ISO files more.Because WD TV Live can well play ISO files from a USB drive, while network shares do have problems actually.

I want to buy some Blu-ray DVDs,who played Blu-ray ISO backups on your WD TV Live?



March 10, 2010, 12:55:19 AM
Reply #20

twisty

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G'day Jimmy,

You're welcome and glad to hear.

Actually, I don't have any problems playing .iso files over my network (ethernet and over power) except when I overtax the NAS.  I've no experience with BD, yet, but will post my thoughts when I do (probably a question better asked in the "Live" forums). 
42" Sony & 32" Teac. Gigabit Network + NetComm NP210 Ethernet over power.  4TB WD ShareSpace NAS.  WDLXTV 0.5.8.1.  MSheet 2.1.1.
Noob WDTV Video Conversion Basics Tutorial http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=3314.0

March 10, 2010, 09:53:50 PM
Reply #21

jimmy8765

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G'day twisty,

I have been doing a ton of research on this matter lately.

Quote
Here's the list  of WD TV HD Media Player supported file formats:

Video: MPEG1/2/4,  WMV9, AVI (MPEG4, Xvid, AVC), H.264, MKV, MOV (MPEG4, H.264), Subtitle SRT  (UTF-8)

Audio: MP3,  WMA, OGG, WAV/PCM/LPCM, AAC, FLAC, Dolby Digital, AIF/AIFF, MKA Playlist PLS,  M3U, WPL

Photo: JPEG,  GIF, TIF/TIFF, BMP, PNG

WD TV HD Media Player promises to play just about any video format you throw at it, including high definition video up to 1080p. You put the videos on any USB mass storage device, like an external hard drive or a thumb drive, and plug it into the device, WD TV HD Media Player will recognize the files on the drive and play any video, audio, or photo files it finds. However, according to the feedback  provided by some users, WD TV HD Media Player does play m2ts selectively only,  some are, and some are not.

So,i think if we want to playback BD on WD TV Live or on TV via WD TV HD Media Player,we need a blu-ray ripper and a video converter.  :(???

March 11, 2010, 12:42:32 PM
Reply #22

twisty

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i think if we want to playback BD on WD TV Live or on TV via WD TV HD Media Player,we need a blu-ray ripper and a video converter.  :(???

... and BD Drive.  My camera mts files play just fine raw across my network.

For more info on converting BD to mkv see jayallans' post here http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=37.0
42" Sony & 32" Teac. Gigabit Network + NetComm NP210 Ethernet over power.  4TB WD ShareSpace NAS.  WDLXTV 0.5.8.1.  MSheet 2.1.1.
Noob WDTV Video Conversion Basics Tutorial http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=3314.0

March 11, 2010, 09:35:11 PM
Reply #23

jimmy8765

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thanks,twisty
 ;)

i find a freeware named MakeMKV,but its output format only .mkv and the file sizes little big.

March 16, 2010, 06:03:10 PM
Reply #24

jimmy8765

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And how do I get these to play on the WD TV (Live)? Can I just put the .m4v file from Handbrake and the subtitles file in a folder on a harddisk, or is a specific container format/file extension required?

And have you tried using several subtitles (in several languages) on the WD TV?

Thanks again for the good work!


Handbrake output format only:MP4 and MKV. WD TV is able to beautifully playback HD MKV files up to  Full HD 1080p

Function comparison about Pavtube Blu-Ray Ripper, AnyDVD HD, and MakeMKV, i choose pavtube blu-ray ripper last,because it enable me directly rip Blu-ray and protected DVD movie from the discs and more cheapper.

Blu-ray DVD vs HD DVD  ;)

March 16, 2010, 08:50:08 PM
Reply #25

twisty

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G'day jimmy,

Handbrake output format only:MP4 and MKV.

Incorrect, sort of  ;)  from http://trac.handbrake.fr/wiki/Containers

"Be aware that chapters and AC3 audio can only be seen by QuickTime if you change the file extension from .mp4 to .m4v. HandBrake will do this for you automatically when you enable those features..."

Same encoding, different file extensions.
42" Sony & 32" Teac. Gigabit Network + NetComm NP210 Ethernet over power.  4TB WD ShareSpace NAS.  WDLXTV 0.5.8.1.  MSheet 2.1.1.
Noob WDTV Video Conversion Basics Tutorial http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=3314.0

August 11, 2010, 01:23:46 AM
Reply #26

turtlerckt

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As I know, handbrake is very popular, I can see it on many websites, this is benefit from free. On the other hand, it is difficult to use for beginner, lack support and weak stability. HandBrake attend technology and ignore user experience.

August 11, 2010, 11:46:33 PM
Reply #27

twisty

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As I know, handbrake is very popular, I can see it on many websites, this is benefit from free. On the other hand, it is difficult to use for beginner, lack support and weak stability. HandBrake attend technology and ignore user experience.
G'day turtlerckt,

Thankyou for your comprehensive post detailing your opinion of Handbrake, and your justifications.  I don't often repond to "advertising" but as you've replied to my post I now feel inclined.  I presume you have already fled the forum.

Handbrake is popular for many reason.  It works, it's free and it's well supported (have you looked at the forums).  If you read all of my initial post you'd also understand that there is a learning curve when manipulating large quantities of complex data.  Beginners will learn the basics as they manipulate the data into a form that suits their needs including containers, encoders, frame rates and interlacing (to name just a few).  These basic settings are preset in Handbrake, and, like any software, it takes practice and experience to become competent in its' use.  If YOU found Handbrake difficult to use then I suggest some more multimedia theory might help. 

I do not agree that Handbrake is unstable.  The only times Hanbrake crashes or stalls (or stops in any way) for me is when I've asked too much of Windoze.  I regularly queue upto 50 encodes and let it run overnight.  Again, the only time I have a failure is when Doze reboots.  Do you have any experience with stability problems?

Handbrake remains the benchmark for quality conversion software.  Of course they are leaders, and often copied.  Check the internet for lawsuits against online sofware companies selling products based on GPL or open source software.  I wonder if these companies are "improving" the customer experience by simply repackaging GPL code?  I've used many different software packages from CAD to databases to games and Handbrake is one of the simpler programs too use!  Like I said above, you have to learn how to use ANY software.

Finally.  Your URL link suggests an affiliation with a commercial product.  If this is the case and your supervisor checks your work then I have these suggestions.  Learn English and correct grammar.  "this is benefit from free" OMG!  Is the software that good as well?  If you want to sell a product at least look like you know what you're doing!  Be honest!  Buy some advertising space from jay!  However, if I've misunderstood your intention, I appologise without reservation and in advance.

I look forward to your reply.
42" Sony & 32" Teac. Gigabit Network + NetComm NP210 Ethernet over power.  4TB WD ShareSpace NAS.  WDLXTV 0.5.8.1.  MSheet 2.1.1.
Noob WDTV Video Conversion Basics Tutorial http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=3314.0

September 08, 2010, 03:27:12 PM
Reply #28

neoculture

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My apologies if I got it wrong, but this looked like the correct group to post this: I need some pointers, please.

I am currently ripping my anime collection to HDD using MakeMKV (yes, I finally managed to get it to work properly... except for "Star Trek: The Motion Picture".  Go figure) which I rip to MKV with a Japanese audio stream and one set of English subtitles.

Sounds good, except that *some* DVD producers have (for example) six episodes as one big video stream which the menu accesses via jumps to the appropriate chapter.  So instead of 6 x 30minutes files, I get a single 180minutes file.

I have tried a few video splitters last night, but they all seem to have *some* problems associated with them.  MKVToolnix (for example) requires you to already know the exact location(s) you wish to split the files at. The other two I tried did have a preview window, but did not seem to understand there was a subtitle stream associated with the MKV file.

Soooo... can anyone recommend a decent video file splitter which:
(a) has a preview window so I can find the split location(s) easily; and
(b) also includes the subtitle stream in the splitting.

Windows or Linux, doesn't matter - no OSX please as I do not have access to Mac (so this would not help).

Many thanks.

September 09, 2010, 12:59:19 AM
Reply #29

twisty

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I am currently ripping my anime collection to HDD using MakeMKV (yes, I finally managed to get it to work properly... except for "Star Trek: The Motion Picture".  Go figure) which I rip to MKV with a Japanese audio stream and one set of English subtitles.

I have tried a few video splitters last night, but they all seem to have *some* problems associated with them. 

Soooo... can anyone recommend a decent video file splitter which:
(a) has a preview window so I can find the split location(s) easily; and
(b) also includes the subtitle stream in the splitting.

G'day neoculture,

Use VLC (as your preview window) to confirm chapter and episode details .

I recommend ripping dvd to hdd then converting. Although it adds another step in the process you can better manipulate and test encoders and output files.  I don't use anything but Handbrake now so ripping to hdd is essential 4 me.  Handbrake will seperate episodes and chapters as well as include subtitles as required.

Hope this helps.
42" Sony & 32" Teac. Gigabit Network + NetComm NP210 Ethernet over power.  4TB WD ShareSpace NAS.  WDLXTV 0.5.8.1.  MSheet 2.1.1.
Noob WDTV Video Conversion Basics Tutorial http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=3314.0