Author Topic: Disappointed No Gigabit Ethernet  (Read 11452 times)

November 11, 2009, 06:26:41 AM
Read 11452 times

netsrac

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Well in searching, I finally found out that the ethernet port is only 10/100, while all the competition is using gigabit.

It seems a lot of people are having problems with WiFi, while I am having problems with wired connections dropping.

It makes no sense to me that I can use a N-wireless and get theoritcally 300 mps, while wired I am maxed to 100 mps.

I like wireless, but my house is prewired with cat5e wiring, and wired connections are always more reliable(supposed to be) than wireless.

Since this is hardware, there can be no update.

WD you dropped the ball on this part (What were you thinking, Gigabit has been around for a while now)

Well I am just waiting for the fixes to come through, I do love WDTV, and at least the WDTV Live has component out so I can watch it on 55" HDTV that does not have HDMI.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2009, 10:58:45 AM by netsrac »

November 11, 2009, 06:44:59 AM
Reply #1

Headcase_Fargone

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What exactly are you streaming that requires more than 100mbps throughput?  1080p tops out at, what?  35mbps?  40 for fast action sequences?

Also, you'll never see anywhere close to 300mbps of actual downstream throughput from a wireless connection, despite what Windows Zero tells you your connection speed is.  Just like you never see close to 1000mbps from gigabit.

November 11, 2009, 06:56:45 AM
Reply #2

netsrac

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Well that is kind of the point, 10/100 will never actually transmit 100 mps, just like N-wireless will not transmit 300 mps

So with newer higher quality films which are larger in size, bandwidth might become an issue.

I am not saying 10/100 is not good enough to stream HD video (time will tell), but why not put a gigabit ethernet in, it is not like gigabit is a brand new technology.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2009, 11:00:45 AM by netsrac »

November 11, 2009, 08:37:00 AM
Reply #3

Fishbowls

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netsrac :
COST + NEED = 10/100 ethernet
and please its gigabit not gigaport. sheesh
end-users wiki http://wdtv.wetpaint.com
Custom Firmware wiki http://wiki.wdtv.org/doku.php
mediainfo http://mediainfo.sourceforge.net
start here http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=1088.msg7613#ms
wdtv+ext3-boot-9.2+sabrent gbit adapter+
rss/weather+disco-webserver. this thing is cool eh.

November 11, 2009, 10:57:45 AM
Reply #4

netsrac

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netsrac :
COST + NEED = 10/100 ethernet
and please its gigabit not gigaport. sheesh

OK I was a DJ for 20 years and used a Gigaport, sort of stuck in my head, but I am sure people understand what I meant.

FYI -  as of 2009 Gigabit NICs (1000BASE-T) are included in almost all desktop and server computer systems.

So why not include it here?

The Popcorn Hour & Patriot (which is cheaper) both have a gigabit ethernet.

The biggest problem with the Patriot is the lack of Mac support. (Note I am not saying either of these boxes are better)

From what I have been reading here, there are a lot of users who actually file transfer to their WDTV Live box (as opposed to streaming), heck WD added software to do this.  I would much rather transfer a 4g file through gigabit than 10/100

I still like the WDTV Live, or I would not have bought 2 of them, when I already have 2 WDTV boxes.  I just can't wait for all the bugs to be figured out.

November 11, 2009, 02:36:32 PM
Reply #5

Headcase_Fargone

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Even if they put a gigabit ethernet port on this thing your transfers would be bottlenecked by the processor.  D-Link put a gigabit port on my NAS, but I've never seen over 12.5mB/sec (100mbps) tranfers to or from it.  I doubt the WDTV would have been any different.

November 11, 2009, 03:15:09 PM
Reply #6

tech324

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They put a 10/100 port because that is all you need for the device.  Don't get caught up thinking that if it had a gigabit port it would be better.  The WDTV has no need for a gigabit port and plus the device/cpu might not even handle that speed anyways.  The device was made to play HD media and the 10/100 can do it just fine.  Hell, I am streaming HD content to my WDTV with wireless and I only get about 19 mbit/sec from the wifi device. 

November 12, 2009, 01:08:44 PM
Reply #7

wiiBox

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Well that is kind of the point, 10/100 will never actually transmit 100 mps, just like N-wireless will not transmit 300 mps

So with newer higher quality films which are larger in size, bandwidth might become an issue.

I am not saying 10/100 is not good enough to stream HD video (time will tell), but why not put a gigabit ethernet in, it is not like gigabit is a brand new technology.
Actually, you're a bit off on that.  100mbs is easily reachable (including protocol overhead) with todays hardware.  1000 is another matter.  As for wireless N, you'll be lucky to get over 60mbps actual throughput in the real world.

Good luck!   :)

November 12, 2009, 02:58:51 PM
Reply #8

Headcase_Fargone

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Thus far the only thing my wireless N connection hasn't been able to handle is an 11gb 1080p BluRay rip.  It would play, but during fast action sequences it takes a dump.  720 plays fine.

November 15, 2009, 10:08:26 AM
Reply #9

bitpicker

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I'm disappointed also, but it wasn't until after I purchased the unit and had problems playing a blu-ray movie straight from the ISO.

I ended up having to pull the m2ts file off of the disc before I saw any improvement.  I also tried the MKV format which showed improvement also

The problem showed it's self as loss or severly interrupted audio, severe pixalization.  The movie(s) would play fine for a while, then go bad.  It did not correct it's self unless I backed up a bit and then played on from there. The problem also did not always occur at the same location in the movie(s).

This was through a wired 100Mb connection.  Wireless 'N' was worse using both the ISO and the m2ts file.

My final test was via an attached hard drive.  My test movies played great!

My conclusion is that 100Mb is not enough for a blu-ray movie.  The 100Mb bandwidth probably barely supports the blu-ray requirements and any burp in the system causes things to go haywire.

Personally, I don't want to have to jump through hoops to store and play my movies.  I want to keep the ISO on my server as a backup to my discs so having to pul the m2ts file from the disk or create the mkv file is a bit of a nusance.

Bu, the price is good enough that I can overlook the short comings until something better comes along.

Maybe, the problem is in the firmware and can be corrected.

Just my opinion.

Thanks.

November 15, 2009, 11:48:29 AM
Reply #10

wiiBox

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You should really try to debug your network setup before blaming it all on the WDTV Live.  Technically 100TX is more than enough for standard BD bitrates.

For one, make sure the Live unit is connecting at full 100mbps instead 10mbps, the fall back rate.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet#Varieties_of_Ethernet

Good luck!

November 15, 2009, 06:30:34 PM
Reply #11

netsrac

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They put a 10/100 port because that is all you need for the device.  Don't get caught up thinking that if it had a gigabit port it would be better.  The WDTV has no need for a gigabit port and plus the device/cpu might not even handle that speed anyways.  The device was made to play HD media and the 10/100 can do it just fine.  Hell, I am streaming HD content to my WDTV with wireless and I only get about 19 mbit/sec from the wifi device. 

I understand what you are saying, but I have read a lot of people having problems streaming HD movies through wireless and wired (stated earlier by someone else)

As far as the CPU not being able to handle those transfer speeds, why do some people have no problem watching HD movies through direct attach usb drive, but have problems through wired Ethernet?

Last I checked USB 2.0 has a transfer rate of 480 mbps, almost 5 times what you can through Ethernet connection.

But then again, if someone is trying to stream through their Ethernet and their attached storage is on a USB hub, then they will have a bottleneck problem if they have many devices attached to the same hub. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_2.0#USB_2.0)

November 16, 2009, 01:12:07 PM
Reply #12

cfoxga

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Comparing the streaming problems of wired to wireless is like comparing strawberries to cranberries.  They are both red fruits, but they definitely taste different!

As others have mentioned here, the WDTV does not require much bandwidth to get 1080p.  Let's say for the sake of argument that you need a CONSTANT 35 Mbps for smooth playback.  The issue is not only the speed, but the ability to consistently maintain that speed.  Let's compare the various connection methods:

USB - You have a direct connection from the WDTV to the hard drive.  Not much will keep you from getting the bandwidth you need 100% of the time.

Wireless N - When your wireless connection is perfect, you might be able to watch 720p or 1080 videos.  However, it won't take much to mess up the signal: someone turning on a laptop to surf the web, or walking to close to the WDTV or wireless router and interfering with the signal. 

Wired - You should be able to easily play 1080p if nothing else is on the network, regardless of the switch you use.  However, once you introduce multiple devices on the network, the potential for trouble increases.  Alot also depends on the switch itself.  Just because the WDTV only supports 100 Mbps doesn't mean that a good gigabit switch isn't necessary.  The limited switching capability of the switch might cause packets to be dropped on their way to the WDTV.

It is true that gigabit WDTV would perform better than a 100 Mbps WDTV when hooked to a gigabit switch, but only if you have other "issues" with your network...

Chris


November 16, 2009, 02:04:45 PM
Reply #13

ovsims

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has anyone thought about a USB gigabit ethernet. I'm having the same problem with full BD backups. And I was wondering if we could attach one to the WD TV Live for the gigagit LAN

November 16, 2009, 06:15:02 PM
Reply #14

wiiBox

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has anyone thought about a USB gigabit ethernet. I'm having the same problem with full BD backups. And I was wondering if we could attach one to the WD TV Live for the gigagit LAN
I think thought of adding such devices are a bit premature.  Network problems with media players are not unique to the WDTV Live.

I would wait (if you can) for a firmware update before investing in additional hardware.  It's not unusual for media players like these to improve network performace with firmware updates.  Even the famous Popcorn Hour A-100 had these problems at launch.


Edit:Time to put my theory to the test!!   :D
New firmware:  http://wdtvforum.com/main/index.php?topic=2884.0
« Last Edit: November 16, 2009, 06:21:26 PM by wiiBox »