Author Topic: 1080P vs 720p - Why cant I see the difference?  (Read 4834 times)

September 15, 2009, 06:08:14 AM
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atvaholic

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Hi, im new here, and did some searching but could not find the information im looking for.

I have a WDTV player with a 50" Samsung 1080P Plasma TV. I downloaded a couple of trailers yesterday, some in 1080P some in 720P. I could not notice the difference. So I got the same trailer in 720 and 1080. I could not notice any difference in quality, color or anything else at all. Is it me? Am I blind or is something else wrong?

Thanks!

September 15, 2009, 07:22:12 AM
Reply #1

elmarweber

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Hi, im new here, and did some searching but could not find the information im looking for.

I have a WDTV player with a 50" Samsung 1080P Plasma TV. I downloaded a couple of trailers yesterday, some in 1080P some in 720P. I could not notice the difference. So I got the same trailer in 720 and 1080. I could not notice any difference in quality, color or anything else at all. Is it me? Am I blind or is something else wrong?

Depending on the source of the trailers that can already be the problem. For example the trailers on Apple's page usually have a lower MBit/s data rate than a 1080p MKV or even a BluRay. Also don't expect the trailers to get the same attention in post processing and encoding as a BluRay release.
And it may even be, but this is just a guess, that for some movies the source material is not 1080p, they just upscale it. At least I get the impression sometimes.

A trailer I used a lot for testing of appletrailerfs recently comes to mind: http://www.apple.com/trailers/magnolia/mutantchronicles/
There you see a definite difference between 720p and 1080p, escpecially in the scenes where the space ship lifts of and the snow falls. As idaho already said, it depends on a lot of factors. I'm sitting about 3m (~10 feet) away from my 50" and I can see the differences between 720p and 1080p, it's the details you get to notice after some time: beard hair, particles, gradients and some time later general image quality.

I did a blind test when buying my plasma, stepping away 0.5m (~1.5ft) steps and the  shop owner played either 720p or 1080p material without me knowing (the question was whether to buy a 50" with full HD or just normal HD resolution). I didn't see the difference at 4 meter. Since my viewing distance is less, I opted for the full HD plasma.

ciao,
elm

September 18, 2009, 09:14:25 AM
Reply #2

Pangadaywalker

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There are people who don't feel the difference on movies and are those that will feel the difference.

Also the cable can impact on the performance. Bad HDMI cable will bring the 1080p movies close to a 720p. Offcourse the movie bitrate and how it was encoded matters most.

I am in the first group, so I don't feel the difference. This is very personal of each one.
My set:

September 23, 2009, 08:40:03 AM
Reply #3

gunman

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Also the cable can impact on the performance. Bad HDMI cable will bring the 1080p movies close to a 720p. Offcourse the movie bitrate and how it was encoded matters most.

The HDMI Cable brings definately NO loss in quality! It's digital... 0's and 1's nothing more and nothing less. You can't get a "bad" signal. If the signal was "bad" you would just get a black screen. That's why we go away from the analogue technique, where cable did make a difference.

September 24, 2009, 02:44:26 AM
Reply #4

Pangadaywalker

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Yes Black. You should get informed before say something like that.

Maybe start with Jitter in digital cables.

Then you come here and post something like that.
My set:

September 24, 2009, 10:12:58 AM
Reply #5

gunman

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Yeah... sure .... the WDTV has no error correction and PLL filters... Jitter comes mainly from cheap oscillator in contrast to the cable or do you think they use high precision japanese ones? We are not in the High End audio sector here...

Cheers

September 26, 2009, 04:29:25 AM
Reply #6

inipi

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Yes, we need to be very clear on all things HDMI that the cable will either work and give you the picture or not work and not give you the picture.  There is no inbetween.  There aren't variations in picture quality.  A 100 /$ cable will not give you a better quality picture than a 10 /$ cable.  It's digital data, 0's & 1's, being transmitted at super high speeds, with parity checking and plenty of scope for resending of data if any of the data gets mangled.  You wouldn't pay vast sums of cash for a USB cable or an Ethernet cable and nor should you on an hdmi cable.  It's just snake oil.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-9967991-1.html

September 28, 2009, 03:57:23 AM
Reply #7

Pangadaywalker

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In another forum I already checked that this information is wrong. You can have variation in the video or audio.

You can have artefacts in the screen, worse color, worse contrast and so on. All depending in the cable construction.

I am not saying that 200 dolars cable are better. Far from that. I never payed more then 10 bucks on a cable. But hdmi is not only 0 and 1.

I saw some tests using DVD players where only using upscaling, that is quite less information in the cable, can cause a lot of problems and still the image is there but with a lot of defects.

I used to believe in the goes or doesn't go but after saw that I had to change my opinion.

Yes, you can have most of the cases where a poor HDMI will have no image at all, but there are also cases where HDMI will transmit most of the signal  but a part of that signal will get unreadable. There is where you have the artifacts.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2009, 04:14:23 AM by Pangadaywalker »
My set:

September 28, 2009, 04:14:56 AM
Reply #8

gsf600y

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It doesn't matter what you send down a cable, errors can occur.  Even fibre optics.

The question is, do you check for errors?  In most computer cables, yes.  In HDMI cables, no.

There is no error checking, so when errors do occur in the HDMI cable, you will see the effect on the screen.
This is why a more expensive cable *may* give a better picture.

http://www.jacobsen.no/anders/blog/archives/2007/03/02/hdmi_and_error_correction_do_your_cables_make_a_difference_v2.html
http://www.avforums.com/forums/high-definition-tv-hardware/804190-do-hdmi-dvi-d-signals-have-parity-bits.html